This project is a result of a 7 week course titled Smart Objects, taught by Carla DianaEach Products of Design student was paired up with a student from the IxD (Interaction Experience Design) department at SVA. As a team, myself and Jennings Hanna had numerous discussions and brainstorm sessions which eventually led to our decision to design a smart bike lock. The lock, Vice, sits securely on the handlebars while biking. The user unlocks the lock via their smart phone app. The app syncs with Vice to incorporate other value add features such as route navigation, destination progress as well as a light. We created a semi-functional prototype through 3D printing that was wired to an Arduino with numerous switches and buttons for LEDs. We then used the prototype to shoot a user experience video throughout the streets of Manhattan.

Credits: Damon Ahola and Jennings Hanna

This is a concept video created to illustrate the experience for a smart bike lock system called Vice. This is a project done for our SVA class, Smart Objects taught by Carla Diana. I teamed up with Jennings Hanna of the IxD, Interactive Experience Design department at SVA.

Credits: Damon Ahola and Jennings Hanna.

Pedal for Change concept user experience video.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

Pedal for Change is a design intervention that encourages New York City MTA subway riders to participate in physical fitness while waiting for their train. By pedaling a stationary cycle, users both enhance their health and earn credit on their MTA MetroCard. For every dollar of credit earned, MTA makes a matching donation to a local or national physical fitness charity, such as Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move organization. An element of competition is included in the experience through a citywide competition of train lines to raise the most money for charity.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

Our team called our NYC subway design intervention Pedal for Change.
Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

Our team called our NYC subway design intervention Pedal for Change.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

The semi-functional mock-up provided a more realistic interaction for our designed intent.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

After locking in appropriate dimensions, we created a semi-functional mock-up of the cycle seat.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

We defined the user flow and interaction for the cycle seat through a low fidelity mock-up.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

Our team mocked up several stationary bike concepts with found objects and foam core. Through these, we were able to estimate appropriate geometries for pedaling while seated as well as address ergonomic issues.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

Our team explored how artifacts in a public space can change behavior by soliciting or enabling interaction. One learning goal of the class was to illustrate how shared resources mediate relationships. Our team decided to focus on creating an interaction within the New York City MTA subway system. Through narrative story boards, we were able to  frame the user experience and define distint touch-points.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

This project is the result of a 5 week class titled Intervention Interaction, taught by Sigi Moeslinger and Masamichi Udagawa of Antenna Design. The problem statement was to design an intervention into a public space to “activate” people who encounter it. The intervention should encourage curiosity, socialization and positive change among the users as well as the community. As obesity is on the rise and physical fitness on the decline, our team wanted to integrate physical activity into people’s lives by utilizing the “down time” of waiting for their train.

Credits: Rona Binay, Richard Clarkson, Cassy Michel & Damon Ahola

It is inevitable, natural disasters are becoming more frequent & at greater magnitude. Victims as well as relief organizations are often unprepared for the devastation. This is quite evident in the most recent aftermath of Storm Sandy. Volunteering through the coalition, Occupy Sandy, I saw the seriousness of immediacy to distribute supplies.  After assessing requirements specific to New York City’s shipping and delivery systems, I looked to solutions to service the stark human needs that both precede, and follow, natural disaster.

The key insight to the project was the recognition that typical disaster supplies—water bottle, soup can, flashlight, batteries—all share the same cylindrical profile, making them an ideal match in terms of form factor. Providing a tubular “case,” then, in the form of a corrugated tube, makes for an appropriate solution in terms of packaging and distribution.

Tube profile:
The size and profile of the tubes are standard size & are being shipped around the world today. The city of New York must work with e-commerce suppliers as well as shipping companies to find an ideal logistics solution. Supply and distribution should be handled locally, to cut down on cost.

Contained supplies:Tubes may be packed with standard basic supplies to aid within the first couple of days post-disaster. Supplies can be catered as needs change throughout the relief effort. The label on the outer surface of the tube may be written on in order to document the contents, destination, name of volunteer who packed it, date, and other pertinent information.

Logistics:Relief tubes will be distributed to homes pre-storm throughout potential disaster areas. Additional relief tubes will then be shipped to relief hubs, from which individuals with then distribute to those in need. 

Logistics:
Relief tubes will be distributed to homes pre-storm throughout potential disaster areas. Additional relief tubes will then be shipped to relief hubs, from which individuals with then distribute to those in need. 

roc is a story about Tommy, a curious boy who finds fascination in rocking (or tipping) objects over. As his obsession escalates throughout the things he encounters, he realizes his actions may be destructive. Tommy finds comfort in the end through a connection with a unique gift from his mother.


Credits:
Crew:
Director: Damon Ahola
Producer: Joseph Weissgold
Set Hand 1: Samantha Moore
Set Hand 2: Mansi Gupta
Cast:
Tommy: Yotam
Mother: Orna
Boy With Bike 1: Emile
Boy With Bike 2: Kiyro